Brian Joyce

Senior Scientist


New Brunswick, ME
brian.joyce@sei-us.org
skype: brian.joyce_sei
+1 (530) 220-2111

Brian's research focuses on developing decision support tools for evaluating various operational strategies in managed water resources systems. He has participated in the development and application of databases and tools used for water resources analysis in a variety of domestic and international settings. Prior to joining SEI-US, Brian worked at the Natural Heritage Institute, where his research focused on defining creative strategies for balancing agricultural, urban and environmental water demands in managed water resources systems. He has worked extensively with the water resource systems simulation model of the California water system used by government agencies for statewide integrated water planning. Brian has used this model to investigate groundwater banking and conjunctive use potential, and to identify promising operational flexibility to enhance river flows for fish and riparian habitat restoration. His other research includes developing management practices to mitigate water and pesticide runoff from orchards. Brian received his Ph.D. in hydrologic sciences from the University of California, Davis in 2005.


Recent Publications by Brian Joyce

Image

Economic implications of agricultural reuse of treated wastewater in Israel: A statewide long-term perspective

Ecological Economics, 135, May 2017, 222–233

Author(s): Reznik, A. ; Huber-Lee, A. ; Joyce, B. ; Feinerman, E.; Finkelshtain, I.; Fisher, F.; Kan, I.
Year: 2017

Description:

The study uses an Israeli version of the Multi-Year Water Allocation System (MYWAS) mathematical programming model to conduct statewide, long-term analyses of three topics associated with agricultural reuse of wastewater. It finds that irrigation with treated wastewater contributes 3.3 billion USD in terms of present value, while avoiding 2.7 billion USD in damages from treated wastewater irrigation.


More information
External Link


Image

Climate change and hydropower in the Southern African Power Pool and Zambezi River Basin: System-wide impacts and policy implications

Energy Policy, 103, April 2017, 84–97

Author(s): Spalding-Fecher, R. ; Joyce, B. ; Winkler, H.
Year: 2017

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: This paper examines climate change impact on hydropower will affect the expansion of the regional electricity system, as well as system costs and greenhouse gas emissions. The output from major Zambezi hydropower plants could decline by 10–20% under a drying climate, while wetting of the basin produces only a marginal increase. At a regional level, the increases in electricity generation costs are relatively small (less than 1% over the long term), but could reach 20–30% in the near term for hydro-dependent countries (e.g. Mozambique and Zambia). Because some hydropower could be displaced by coal, regional greenhouse gas emissions could increase by the equivalent of a large coal-fired power station.
More information
External Link


Image

Lesotho Water Security and Climate Change Assessment

World Bank Group working paper

Author(s): Wishart, M. ; Huber-Lee, A. ; Joyce, B. ; Galaitsi, S. ; Emenanjo, I.; Liden, R.; Heumesser, C.; Engle, N.L.; Croneborg, L.; Yates, D.; et al.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources ; Climate Mitigation Policy

Description: This working paper presents the results of an assessment of Lesotho’s water resources management system that explored adaptation strategies across a range of potential future climate conditions.
More information
External Link


Image

The Cost of Covering Costs: A Nationwide Model for Water Pricing

Water Economics and Policy, online 13 July 2016

Author(s): Reznik, A. ; Huber-Lee, A. ; Joyce, B. ; Feinerman, E.: Finkelshtain, I.; Kan, I.; Fisher, F.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description:

This report finds optimal aggregated desalination in Israel is just 33% of the present capacity, suggesting construction of desalination facilities could have been delayed.


More information
External Link


Image

Analysing stakeholder driven scenarios with a transboundary water planning tool for IWRM in the Jordan River basin

In: Integrated Water Resources Management: Concept, Research and Implementation, pages 413-433

Author(s): Bonzi, C. ; Joyce, B. ; Onigkeit, J.; Hoff, H.; Tielbörger, K.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: This book chapter presents the application of a transboundary spatially explicit water resources simulation and planning tool in support of decision-making in a contentious setting. Although integrated water resources management (IWRM) has become the mainstream concept for water management, its implementation in transboundary, politically tense settings, such as the Jordan River basin, is still limited. In this study, the authors integrated socio-economic scenarios and water management strategies resulting from a stakeholder process, thereby including socio-economic uncertainty, using the WEAP modelling software. Tool development was supported by an active transboundary dialogue between scientists and stakeholders.
More information
External Link